Interesting title! Let's see who's starring in it - hey, there's MORE TITLE!

 

 

Yes, it's the Colossus of New Yawk. The movie does not begin promisingly. Any movie that begins with two guys watching an industrial film is telling you that the thrills and/or chills will be doled out sparingly, or will be something to which we work up.

 

 

I wasn't paying attention to the credits, so I was a bit startled to see the guy who plays the World's Most Brilliant Scientist. Can you identify him?

 

 

Ross Martin, who always struck me as Bones McCoy's more affable, and possibly smarter, brother. Mycroft to his Holmes, if you will. Unfortunately, something bad happens to the Smartest Man in the World:

 

 

How bad? This bad. Dead bad.

 

 

And that's where this guy comes in. His father. His almost-as-brilliant scientist father. I love this guy:

 

 

Of course, he's going to perform . . . an EXPERIEMENT. Make sure you put on the surgical mask, dad; wouldn't want the corpse to get sick:

 

 

No, this won't raise any questions at the funeral:

 

 

Of course, dad puts his son's brain into a Col-los-sus, also known as the world's most hungover robot:

 

 

Rest assured that the brain does not enjoy looking in the mirror and discovering what he has become:

 

 

If you're thinking, well, bogus cheesy monster movie, no. Not exactly. It's helped by the score, which is all a single piano banging away, and the somewhat almost heart-tugging attempts of the Colossus to connect witih his son. If you're wondering if he turns into a monster: please! That's just the sort of thing Scientist Dad knows will not happen. The brian is supreme! without the body, it is freed of petty concerns! Why, the Colossus will benefit mankind. Sure enough, he invites scientific and cultural luminaries to UN, where it's checkerboard day:

 

 

He addresses the People of The United Nations of Earth:

 

 

Annnnnnd kills 'em all.

 

 

You may wonder: pruning hooks?

All in all, a good B movie, with a somber tone, a notable score, a kid irritating enough to belong to Rob and Laura Petrie, a big bulky monster, and some other details that make it worth its short running time.